The CSR Newsletters are a freely-available resource generated as a dynamic complement to the textbook, Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility: Sustainable Value Creation.

To sign-up to receive the CSR Newsletters regularly during the fall and spring academic semesters, e-mail author David Chandler at david.chandler@ucdenver.edu


Friday, April 24, 2015

Strategic CSR - The politics of climate change

In light of much of the media coverage that accompanied Earth Day on Wednesday, the article in the url below offers a hopeful take on the state of the climate change debate here in the U.S.:
 
"An overwhelming majority of the American public, including half of Republicans, support government action to curb global warming, according to a poll conducted by The New York Times, Stanford University and the nonpartisan environmental research group Resources for the Future."
 
This is encouraging/surprising/hopeful because it runs counter to the prevailing narrative, which focuses largely on partisan stereotypes:
 
"Among Republicans, 48 percent say they are more likely to vote for a candidate who supports fighting climate change. … Many Republican candidates question the science of climate change or do not publicly address the issue."
 
As the article notes, hopefully this information will be picked up by pollsters and influence the debate as we ease into the 2016 presidential campaign:
 
"… the poll also found that two-thirds of Americans said they were more likely to vote for political candidates who campaign on fighting climate change. They were less likely to vote for candidates who questioned or denied the science that determined that humans caused global warming."
 
Have a good weekend.
David
 
David Chandler & Bill Werther
 
Instructor Teaching and Student Study Site: http://www.sagepub.com/chandler3e/
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The library of CSR Newsletters are archived at: http://strategiccsr-sage.blogspot.com/
 
 
Most Republicans Support Government Action on Climate Change
By Coral Davenport and Marjorie Connelly
January 31, 2015
The New York Times
Late Edition – Final
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