The CSR Newsletters are a freely-available resource generated as a dynamic complement to the textbook, Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility: Sustainable Value Creation.

To sign-up to receive the CSR Newsletters regularly during the fall and spring academic semesters, e-mail author David Chandler at david.chandler@ucdenver.edu


Friday, August 26, 2016

Strategic CSR - Facebook

The article in the url below raises a fascinating question about our increasingly virtual and shared lives:
 
"That photo of your toddler running around in a nappy or having a temper tantrum? Think before you post it on Facebook. That's the advice from French authorities, which have warned parents in France they could face fines of up to €45,000 (£35,000) and a year in prison for publishing intimate photos of their children on social media without permission, as part of the country's strict privacy laws."
 
Given the extent of the problem, it is not hard to imagine a scenario where some children seek redress for photos that subsequently are deemed too embarrassing and, potentially, a constraint on their lives once they become adults (e.g., affecting employment possibilities, dating even?):
 
"A 2015 study by internet company Nominet found parents in the UK post nearly 200 photos of their under fives online every year, meaning a child will feature in around 1,000 online photos before their fifth birthday."
 
Something that should create pause for thought before your next online post:
 
"'Your favourite picture of your child sitting on the potty for the first time may not be their favourite picture of themselves when they're 13,' says author and child psychologist Catherine Steiner-Adair."
 
Have a good weekend
David
 
 
Instructor Teaching and Student Study Site: https://study.sagepub.com/chandler4e
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The library of CSR Newsletters are archived at: https://strategiccsr-sage.blogspot.com/
 
 
Could children one day sue parents for posting baby pics on Facebook?
By Nicole Kobie
May 8, 2016
The Guardian