The CSR Newsletters are a freely-available resource generated as a dynamic complement to the textbook, Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility: Sustainable Value Creation.

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Friday, March 13, 2015

Strategic CSR - Compost

The article in the url below contains one of the best recycling ideas I have seen in a while:
 
"A non-profit group in Seattle hopes to become the first organisation in the world to tackle overcrowding in cemeteries by turning human corpses into garden compost."
 
As the intrepid entrepreneur who devised the project (Katrina Spade, an architect) correctly notes:
 
"'The idea is to fold the dead back into the city, … The options we currently have for our bodies are lacking . . . from an environmental standpoint, but also, and perhaps more importantly, from a meaning standpoint.'"
 
More specifically, the idea is to convert dead people into "soil-building material." The project, which is aptly named the "Urban Death Project," revolves around the three-story facility ("the core") that Spade has designed and plans to construct with the $80,000 grant funding already received:
 
"Bodies would be inserted into the core after being wrapped in linen. … The body would then be smothered with woodchips and other carbon-rich material. Over several weeks a corpse would be transformed into about one cubic metre of compost, which could be taken by the family or donated to nearby farms or community gardens."
 
Humans are the only species on Earth that creates waste. This proposal would certainly be one way we can reduce that impact.
 
Have a good weekend.
David
 
David Chandler & Bill Werther
 
Instructor Teaching and Student Study Site: http://www.sagepub.com/chandler3e/
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The library of CSR Newsletters are archived at: http://strategiccsr-sage.blogspot.com/
 
 
Dearly Departed Sent to Compost Heap
By Rhys Blakely
December 22, 2014
The Times